Our Mission

The Animal Care & Use Program fosters a culture of excellence, compassion, and adherence to the highest standards of animal welfare in the conduct of research, testing, and teaching at the University of Michigan.

A Message from Our Leadership

Male and female scientist in laboratory performing biopsy

For decades, laboratory animals have been essential to almost every major advance in human and animal medicine. The University of Michigan community is committed to the highest standards of excellent and humane care in the use of these animals in its research, and we believe that this commitment is central to the rigor and impact of our work.

Our approach goes beyond strict adherence to all required guidelines. In addition, we embrace the principles known as “the three Rs”: reducing the number of animals used to the minimum required for the study, replacing animals with less sentient or non-animal models whenever possible, and refining all practices to provide the best animal welfare possible.

Our Program comprises three units that support our campus-wide research community and ensure our collective commitment to the welfare of all animals under our care:

Through projects and training activities that span a wide variety of fields, including medicine, dentistry, natural resources and the environment, engineering, public health, and kinesiology, scientific and medical knowledge developed through animal research has saved countless lives and improved health outcomes for both humans and animals.

Some examples of life-changing research projects and teaching programs at the University of Michigan are highlighted in the stories below. 

Regards,

S. Jack Hu, PhD
Vice President for Research
Professor of Engineering
Institutional Official

William Greer, BS, CPIA, LAT, CM
Assistant Vice President for Research - Animal Program Compliance Oversight
Director, Animal Care & Use Office

William King, DVM, PhD, DACLAM
Assistant Vice President for Research - Animal Resources
Attending Veterinarian
Executive Director, Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine
Clinical Professor of Laboratory Animal Medicine

Daniel D. Myers, DVM, MPH, DACLAM
Associate Professor of Surgery
Chair, Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee

From left, Hideaki Fujiwara, M.D., Ph.D.; Grace Chen, M.D., Ph.D.; and Pavan Reddy, M.D. Photo credit: Leisa Thompson
Monday, April 1, 2019Mice Unlock Possible Clues to Limit a Common Side Effect of Bone Marrow Transplants
In a surprising finding, researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have shown that knocking out NLRP6, a protein that plays a protective role in other diseases, led to better outcomes and less-severe symptoms after bone marrow transplants in mice.
White rat looks at camera with nesting material in the background
Sunday, March 10, 2019Monitoring Sleeping Rats May Solve Puzzle Behind Long-Term Memory Processing
To better understand the role that sleep plays in the formation of new memories, an international team of researchers designed a new study to monitor the brain activity of sleeping rats after they completed a new maze. Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, the team discovered that the process of ‘replay’ may help cellular consolidation and trigger memory transfer from the hippocampus to other brain regions.
This image depicts CDC microbiologist Valerie Albrecht, as she was holding up for observation, two Petri dish culture plates that had been inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria
Monday, December 17, 2018Mice Aid in the Discovery of How Mitochondria Help Fight Life-Threatening Bacteria
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, also known as MRSA, has occasionally been known to cause life-threatening infections. In a study published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, Michigan Medicine researchers share how mouse models helped them discover the important role that mitochondria play in supporting the immune system’s response against MRSA infection.

Questions?

As a public institution and an accredited site for animal use, we are open to inquiries, reports of concern, or other communications from within and beyond the U-M. Questions about the care and use of laboratory animals at the University of Michigan should be directed to acuoffice@umich.edu